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Review in Yeah I Know It Sucks

Robert Witt - Midazolam (tracks 1-7): "Robert Witt is controlling every inch of the sound, making sure that every second is balanced, equally interesting and quite hypnotic in form."

Published: November 18, 2014
Tags: esc.rec.22, Press

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Robert Witt – Midazolam (tracks 1-7)
Review in Yeah I Know It Sucks:

Breathtaking sonic landscapes and slightly twisted imaginative sounds is what you probably will encounter when exposing your ears to the wonderful and notable warm world of Robert Witt’s Midazolam. Midazolam consists of 13 tracks in total, which is split up in two different releases. The split is understandable as this is material that simply put: needs your full attention.

If you enjoy sounds and atmospheric atmospheres to become apparent story tellers or absorbing the environment and replacing it with new ones, than this album is definitely something you will enjoy. Even though ambient is in most circles considered as back ground music, I feel that the creations done here by Robert Witt are not of this kind. They are needed to be sit down for and asks for your time to completely enjoy the audioscapes and the fine details within.

The first track opens up nicely with prominent smooth and deep layers of soothing audio art that has a very nice flow to it, something that would suit an Ad Visser new age experience without the annoyance of a character like Ad Visser himself. In fact it is better not to mention Ad Visser in a review for these beautiful audio works by Robert de Witt, as there is obviously only space for one audio genius here and thank god it isn’t Visser.

Robert Witt is the one controlling every inch of the sound, making sure that every second is balanced and equally interesting as well as being quite hypnotic in form. The second track combines very fresh inserted clicks on top of a very beautiful smoothness that makes me think of some hybrid ‘thing’ made out of soft clouds and a trance inducing didgeridoo. It certainly has a positive effect on the brain; it relaxedly abducts the thoughts to become simply one with the sound. The transition of something highly digital into a atmospheric audio scene that fits in a more natural environment is stunning. The birds outside my window sing through it and they sound as if they too want to be inside the sound mix.

The third piece has a balance over it that feels a bit like listening to the sound of a continuous harmonic happening from an ancient temple in the middle of the Asian Jungle mixed with a few electronic made rather large moths that seem to be more attracted to the microphone of Robert Witt than a normal light source. Strangely they are joined by the sound of to me unknown insects or animals. Perhaps they are the sounds of never discovered species, or simply the result of Robert Witt creating audio illusions to trip on.

Track four revolves around more nature expressions or emulations. There is the good use of fieldrecordings, a lot of depth that creates the audio atmosphere of listening to something in a undisclosed location in which Mother Nature is one with the creation of Robert Witt. It really seems to transport the visual mind to a fantasy land that is green, mysterious and yet again very friendly for humans. Robert Witt also manages to star as a human beat box without disturbing the atmosphere. It adds a pleasant humanity in to the piece.

It’s good to know in the back of our minds that this world is an audio illusion created by this sound artist as the next track has brought more the view of a lonely swamp in the middle of a damp ground. There is the feeling of a strange soft presence of unknown insects and a very close sounding breathing of some kind of creature. It might be a gigantic sleeping toad, or perhaps it’s the sound of a alligator doing a little nap. Even though the ambiance is soft and comfortable; there is a tense feeling of darkness. What if the non-existing creature is actually real and wakes up hungry?

It sounds as if the deeper the ears sink in Robert Witt’s Midazolam, the more bizarre the work becomes. At the beginning of the next to last track the soundscape reminds me of a pair of postal pigeons chatting in their recreational zone under the roof of an old fashioned wooden attic. A little warm cracking adds to the coziness of it all, before popping up in the weird unexplainable corner of sound that might be coming out of a experimental ghost box. There are other birds like imitations making their chirping sounds while a strange voice moans or mumbles in a digital way. A hint of something church like… I can’t put my finger on this track and say clearly what it is that my finger points out; it’s a strange happening; mixing coziness with something more untouchable in a somehow sinister way.

The last track comes across as listening to an industrial wasteland. The land is alive and breaths in sounds, some abstract energy crisper sounds can be traced and from a large landscape it becomes smaller and drier until it finally stops. It is a bit as if Robert Witt fades out the amazing soundscapes and fades in the normal day reality. This is a good transition and a fine moment to present you a link to this well-engineered album. Midazolam is no background material but an experience, so only click and start when you are ready: http://escrec.bandcamp.com/album/midazolam-tracks-1-7

(KN)

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